OWLET SMART SOCK BABY MONITOR

A good baby monitor helps to reassure parents that their baby is OK when asleep and not held in their arms. The first six months can be an anxious time and in 2013 a group of friends, all new dads, in the US got the idea for a new type of monitor, a monitor that uses pulse oximetry to track the baby’s heart rate and oxygen levels to more accurately determine the baby’s well being.

This technology is commonly used in hospitals by placing a clip with a reader on the patient’s finger and the challenge of developing a reader small enough for a newborn began. 2 years later the Owlet Smart Sock was born.

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The small pulse oximeter is inserted into a special sock that goes on the baby’s foot. The reader sends a signal to the base station via Bluetooth and you will be notified if you need to attend to your child. You can also download the app and get all notifications on your phone provided you have Wifi available.

The Smart Sock is suitable from newborn to 18 months (or 13kg). After that the set parameters for the readings no longer suit the child’s age. It is probably fair to say that by that age, the most anxious period as a parent in terms of sleep has passed and the careful tracking is no longer needed.

Your child will naturally grow over the 18 months and 3 fabric sock sizes are included with the monitor. It is important that you use the correct size to ensure the electronic reader sits optimally on your baby’s foot and to ensure that it is comfortable. The reader omits no heat of any consequence and cannot burn your child but a sock that is too tight or not clean can cause some redness. This is easy to avoid by using the correct sock size and by washing it regularly as per the instructions.

POINT OF DIFFERENCE

Until the Owlet technology launched, the main choice of monitor was either video and/or breathing pads.

These alternatives provide some level of security, however a visual image of a sleeping baby doesn’t necessarily tell you about your baby’s health. Further, the video feed needs visual assessment by the parent to determine if things are OK. This means that at night, you need to wake up completely to really look at the picture.

As for the breathing pads, it is quite normal for babies to hold their breath, so such a sensor may activate its alarm and frighten you, when in fact all is well.

We feel that the Owlet Smart Sock provides the greatest level of assurance thanks to the pulse oximeter technology applied.

 

CAMERA

A live video feed is a great addition to your set up and an Owlet video camera will be launched in Australia in March 2019. The new camera integrates fully with the Smart Sock monitor and a new version of the app lets you see both the video feed and the sock readings at the same time.